Nov
13
2017
0

Have You Checked In On Your Older Loved One Lately? “Driving”

Have you checked in on your older in-laws and parents lately? The holiday season affords a good opportunity for you to see them and observe how they are doing. Here are a few things you should consider when you see them.

Driving

If your older loved one is still driving, find an excuse to ride with them, and observe their behind the wheel skills. Check to see if there are any obvious dents or dings on their car. Do they miss signs and signals? Do they drive very slowly? Do they get lost easily? A client of mine told me that he recently rode with his 87 year old grandmother. I asked him how the experience was, and he told me that it was not good. My client said that in his opinion, his grandmother only had about 10% of the ability that is required to drive an automobile, and that she definitely should not be driving. He said that his grandmother would signal before changing lanes, but that she had no idea if there was anyone in the adjoining lane, and that she almost caused a crash on their ride. He said that she would not drive on the freeways or at night, which is good. He also said that she would only made right hand turns if at all possible.

These are all signs that it may be time to reduce the need for the older person to drive, if possible. You could suggest to them that in addition to not driving at night, that they should drive only during non-commute hours. You could also look into alternative transportation services for them, such as local buses, taxis and Uber or Lyft. Rossmoor has a bus, and there are dial-a-bus services available. If you have the time, you could offer to take your older loved ones to their errands and appointments.

Michael J. Young

Elder Law and Asset Protection Attorney

Medi-Cal Attorney Walnut Creek

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

Nov
02
2017
0

Preventing Financial Elder Abuse – Wait Three Days Before Signing Anything

How to Prevent Financial Elder Abuse – Wait Three Days Before Signing Anything:

When I was a child and I earned some money, a hole would immediately start burning in my pocket. I would be excited and tell my mother what I wanted to buy with the money. She would tell me to think about it, and to wait three days before buying anything. This was my mother’s “three day rule.”

Waiting the three days gave me a chance to think about whether the expenditure of my hard earned money was a good idea or not. Often times, I would forget about the purchase and move on to something else during those three days. The three days also gave me a chance to talk to my parents and friends and ask for their advice before I made the purchase. Also during that time, my father would strongly encourage me to save my hard earned money. I am sure that the “three day rule” saved me a lot of money, grief and disappointment.

In order to avoid financial elder abuse, we should take my mother’s “three day rule” advice. Wait three days before you sign anything that requires spending your money. During that time, ask other professionals, family members and friends what they think about the deal or contract. Do not do business with people or organizations you do not know. Ask for referrals from  professionals and your friends and family members regarding the purchase of products and services. That fact that you are being rushed may be an indication that you are being pressured into a bad deal.

Typical financial elder abuse situations that we see include but are not limited to: Time share sales; Inappropriate financial sales and advice; and Real Property Investments. Also, a reverse mortgage may not be right for you, so seek professional advice before entering signing the contract. A movie star on TV may not be the best person to take advice from regarding a reverse mortgage.

Michael J. Young

Elder Law and Asset Protection Attorney

Medi-Cal Attorney Walnut Creek

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

Oct
24
2017
0

Preventing Financial Elder Abuse-Personal Relationships

One red flag that we have seen showing possible elder abuse is exhibited by family members who are overly zealous about preserving the money that is being spent for the older person’s care. We have seen family members who are “caring” for an older person, refuse to spend sufficient funds for the older person’ care. This attitude may actually endanger the older person’s health and welfare. These family members may be more concerned about preserving their possible “inheritance” than they are in caring for the older relative, and they may be guilty of financial elder abuse. These are the same family members who will say that this is the older person’s money, that the older person has earned it over their lifetime, and that the family members don’t really care if they “get” anything. Another red flag for elder abuse that we have seen is the sudden advent of relatives or old friends, who have not been seen for years, who are now expressing great concern and interest in “helping” the older person. Another “red flag” for possible elder financial abuse are caretakers who show an unusual interest in the older person’s finances. In these cases, it may be appropriate for the older person to engage the services of a geriatric care manager or professional fiduciary, who can manage the older person’s finances. The older person’s attorney-in-fact under their financial durable power of attorney may be called upon to engage these services if the older person has lost capacity. An elder law attorney and Medi-Cal attorney can help you with the appropriate language and design in the creation of your financial durable power of attorney and other estate planning documents, which may be needed for your care and for Medi-Cal qualification. As always, you should have your estate planning documents prepared sooner than later, and while you still can.

Michael J. Young

Elder Law and Asset Protection Attorney

Medi-Cal Attorney Walnut Creek

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

Oct
17
2017
0

Prevent Financial Abuse: Financial & Estate Planning

Financial and Estate Planning:

One of the best ways to prevent financial elder abuse, is to make sure that you know what your financial assets are at all times. You should be in contact with your financial advisor on a regular basis to determine whether there have been any changes to your accounts. Do not be afraid of calling him or her to ask questions. Find out if your required minimum distributions from your qualified accounts, like IRA’s, are being made properly. Ask if you have any outstanding life insurance or long term care insurance. Have a discussion regarding your financial needs and income, and whether your accounts and investments should be reviewed or reallocated.

Check your bank balances on a regular basis. You should know what your monthly bills are, and how much money you have in your accounts at all times. You can arrange with your bank to view your accounts on line. If you need help paying your bills or managing your accounts, you can ask a trusted friend or family member. There are also professional fiduciaries who can assist you in paying your bills.

Never have your estate planning documents, such as your revocable living trust and financial durable power of attorney, updated by non-attorneys or document preparers. There is much involved in estate planning, and you may be creating more problems for yourself and your family by not having an attorney help you.

Michael J. Young

Elder Law and Asset Protection Attorney

Medi-Cal Attorney Walnut Creek

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

Oct
10
2017
0

How To Prevent Financial Elder Abuse – The Telephone

The telephone is widely used for financial elder abuse. Remember that you do not have to immediately answer the telephone. You should let the caller leave a voice mail. That way you can find out who the caller is and only call back if you choose to do so.

If you do happen to answer the phone, you should hang up immediately if the caller is trying to sell you something. Just tell the caller no regarding any prizes, requests for money from people you don’t know and requests for money from religious and charitable organizations. Also keep in mind that you have NOT WON anything, regardless of what the caller tries to tell you.

Do not under any circumstances give out any of your personal information, any credit card numbers or your social security card number over the phone.

Before you commit to anything over the phone, discuss the issue with a trusted family member, your Elder Law Attorney or financial advisor.

Michael J. Young

Elder Law and Asset Protection Attorney

Medi-Cal Attorney Walnut Creek

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

Oct
10
2017
0

California 2017 Revised Medi-Cal Desk Reference

CALIFORNIA 2017
REVISED MEDI-CAL DESK REFERENCE
Divestment Penalty Divisor $8,515.00
Individual Resource Allowance $2,000.00
Monthly Personal Needs Allowance $35.00
Community Spouse Resource
Allowance $120,900.00
Monthly Maintenance Needs
Allowance $3,023.00
Resource Allowance for a Couple
(Husband and Wife both in facility) $2,000.00/each

Medi-Cal Attorney, Michael J. Young, Walnut Creek, CA

925-256-0298

Jun
19
2017
0

Durable Powers Of Attorney For Young Adults

We usually don’t think estate planning documents are necessary for younger adults. But consider the potential need for financial and health care powers of attorney for them. We received a recent call from a client whose 23 year old daughter, Jenny, was in a severe automobile accident. Jenny suffered traumatic brain injury in the accident. After two weeks in the hospital, she was transferred to a skilled nursing facility for rehabilitation. Jenny has not been cognizant enough to make medical or health care decisions for herself.

Our client called us because Jenny does not have financial or medical powers of attorney, or a HIPAA statement for access to her medical records. Our client and her husband are running into problems making medical and financial decisions on behalf of Jenny. They are also having difficulty gaining access to Jenny’s medical records. If Jenny’s incapacity continues, a conservatorship proceeding in probate court may be the only resolution to this problem. In a conservatorhip proceeding, the probate court judge appoints another person, the “conservator” to care for and make decisions on behalf of another adult, the “conservatee. A probate court conservatorship proceeding is time consuming, intrusive to the family and expensive. This dilemma could have been avoided if Jenny already had these basic estate planning documents. After all, we never know what may happen to any of us at any time.

Please feel free to contact our office should you need help with estate planning, asset protection, and qualifying for and applying for Medi-Cal. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Jun
13
2017
0

Your Home and The “Heggstad” Petition

Your home should be transferred to your revocable living trust for various reasons. One reason is to avoid probate of your home upon your death. Another reason is that as of January 1, 2017, if you die after having been on Medi-Cal, the state will not be able to pursue recovery against your home if it is in your revocable living trust.

Some individuals, for various reasons, take their home out of their revocable living trust and do not transfer it back to their trust before they die. One reason the home is taken out of the trust is for re-finance purposes. Some lenders require that your home not be in your trust when you re-finance your mortgage. As a result, the escrow company may prepare a deed for you to sign, taking your home out of the trust. Escrow will usually not transfer your home back into your trust after escrow closes, because they would be violating the lender’s escrow instructions. As a result, you should transfer your home back into your trust after the close of escrow, unless there is a good reason for you not to do so. When you make this transfer back to your trust, your home will not be re-assessed, and the transfer will not trigger the due-on-transfer clause in the deed of trust which secures your mortgage.

The problem is that if you die, and title to your home is not in the trust, your home will need to be probated. A probate can take up to a year to complete, and is a costly process. Fortunately, there is a shorter court process in California that we can use to obtain a court order transferring your home back into your trust after you die. This is called the “Heggstad” Petition, which is named after a court case. If we can prove to the court through this court petition and supporting declarations that it was the obvious intention of the maker of the trust to keep his or her home in the trust, the court may grant an order, transferring the home back into the trust, thereby avoiding probate. This procedure is not guaranteed, but the courts have been more willing in recent years to grant this petition. As a result, if you take your home out of your trust, check to be sure that you have transferred it back into your trust, unless there is a good reason not to do so.

Please feel free to contact our office should you need help with estate planning, asset protection, and qualifying for and applying for Medi-Cal. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Jun
01
2017
0

Medi-Cal Qualification and Joint Accounts

If you are applying for Medi-Cal, you will be required to disclose all of your assets in your application package. Medi-Cal wants to see evidence of all of your accounts, even joint accounts that you may have with someone else. Joint accounts will be considered by Medi-Cal, at least initially, to belong to you alone. So for instance, if you have a joint savings account with your daughter, Medi-Cal will view that account as belonging to you alone. As a result, the value of the account may disqualify you for Medi-Cal.

You may be able to remedy the situation if you can prove to Medi-Cal that all or a portion of the fund does not belong to you. You can also spend the money in the account on yourself, make repairs to your home, pay down your mortgage, etc. You may also be able to gift the money, or a portion of it from the account. As we have explained in previous blogs however, gifting can create periods of ineligibility for Medi-Cal if it is not done correctly.

Planning for asset protection and Medi-Cal with your estate planning and asset protection attorney at an early stage, can be very beneficial. Your revocable living trust and financial durable powers of attorney can also be amended to have the required gifting and asset protection provisions for Medi-Cal qualification, should you become incapable at some point of handling these matters on your own.

Please feel free to contact our office should you need help with estate planning, applying for Medi-Cal and asset protection. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

May
31
2017
0

California Still Has A 30 Month Look Back for Gifting

California still has the 30 Month Look Back Penalty Period for Gifting. There is a federal law known as the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA), which has a 60 month look back penalty period. However, California has not to date implemented that law. Medi-Cal eligibility workers are required to use the 30 month look back period.

When you apply for Medi-Cal, the application asks whether you have given away any countable, or non-exempt assets within the last 30 months. If you have made such a gift without consideration, or for less than fair market value within the 30 months prior to making the application, a penalty period of ineligibility may be imposed. Transfers of any kind between spouses are exempt and do not create any periods of ineligibility.

The penalty transfer amount, which is also known as the monthly average nursing home private pay rate, is presently $8,515. The penalty period starts when the transfer is made, as opposed to when you make the Medi-Cal application. To calculate the penalty period, first check to see if it was made more than 30 months prior to making the Medi-Cal application. If more than 30 months have passed, there is no penalty.

Lets assume however that you have gifted $50,000 to your grandchild on October 1, 2016, and that you are applying for Medi-Cal on January 1, 2017. The gift was made 3 months prior to the application, so the 30 month look back penalty rule applies. You then divide $50,000 by $8,515, which reflects 5.87, which is rounded down to 5 months of ineligibility, starting from the date of the transfer. As a result, you would be ineligible for Medi-Cal during the months of October, when the gift was made, November, December, January and February, but you would be eligible March 1, 2017. There are of course other rules to consider, which may be to your benefit, which your elder law attorney can help you with.

Please feel free to contact our office should you need help with applying for Medi-Cal, and asset protection. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

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